Recommended Reads for Adults

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  therethere

There, There by Tommy Orange

The story of twelve Urban Indians living in Oakland, California. As we learn the reasons that each person is attending the Big Oakland Powwow-some generous, some fearful, some joyful, some violent-momentum builds toward a shocking yet inevitable conclusion that changes everything. -Rachel

  asymmetry

Asymmetry by Lisa Halliday

The story of Alice, a young American editor, and her relationship with the famous and much older writer Ezra Blazer contrasts with Amar, an Iraqi-American man who, on his way to visit his brother in Kurdistan, is detained by immigration officers. These two seemingly disparate stories gain resonance as their perspectives interact and overlap. - Rachel

  sevenhusbandsofevelynhugo

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid

In this entrancing novel “that speaks to the Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor in us all” a legendary film actress reflects on her relentless rise to the top and the risks she took, the loves she lost, and the long-held secrets the public could never imagine. -Rachel

  todaywillbedifferent

Today Will Be Different by Maria Semple

Eleanor knows she's a mess. But today, she will tackle the little things. But before she can put her modest plan into action-life happens. Just when it seems like things can't go more awry, an encounter with a former colleague produces a graphic memoir whose dramatic tale threatens to reveal a buried family secret. -Rachel

  myyearofrestandrelaxation

My Year of Rest and Relaxation by Ottessa Moshfegh

Our narrator should be happy. She's young, thin, pretty, a recent Columbia graduate. But there is a dark and vacuous hole in her heart. Through the story of a year spent under the influence of a truly mad combination of drugs designed to heal our heroine from her alienation from this world, Moshfegh shows us how reasonable, even necessary, alienation can be. -Rachel

  tatooistofauschwitz

The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris

This beautiful, illuminating tale of hope and courage is based on interviews that were conducted with Holocaust survivor and Auschwitz-Birkenau tattooist Ludwig (Lale) Sokolov—an unforgettable love story in the midst of atrocity. -Rachel

  bornacrime

Born a Crime by Trevor Noah

Trevor Noah’s unlikely path from apartheid South Africa to the desk of The Daily Show began with a criminal act: his birth. Trevor was born to a white Swiss father and a black Xhosa mother at a time when such a union was illegal. Finally liberated by the end of South Africa’s tyrannical white rule, Trevor and his mother began embracing the opportunities won by a centuries-long struggle. -Rachel

  destinyoftherepublic

Destiny of the Republic by Candice Millard

James Abram Garfield was one of the most extraordinary men ever elected president. But four months after his inauguration in 1881, he was shot in the back by a deranged office-seeker named Charles Guiteau. Garfield survived the attack, but became the object of bitter, behind-the-scenes struggles for power—over his administration, over the nation's future, and, hauntingly, over his medical care. -Rachel

  undesired

The Undesired by Yrsa Sigurðardóttir

Icelandic mystery author Yrsa Sigurðardóttir's thriller weaves together two seemingly disparate tales from decades apart. This unconventional story is infused with unexpected twists, engrossing characters and a delightfully shocking, unpredictable ending. The audio narration is wonderful and can be downloaded from My Media Mall. The APP for MyMediaMall is Libby. -Jill

  aplaceforus

A Place for Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza

Moving portrait of a Muslim American family finding its way through the 21st Century. While over the decades Rafiq and his wife Layla have had to deal with repercussions from cataclysmic events such as 9/11 and deaths of parents, they face their greatest challenge as their rebellious youngest child comes of age and pushes against the strictures of the Muslim faith. How do they, as devout Muslims, balance their love of their son with their own beliefs? -Nancy

  heartsinvisiblefuries

The Heart’s Invisible Furies by John Boyne

In an often exuberant, sometimes heartbreaking journey, Boyne takes the reader through Ireland's history from 1945 to the present all through the eyes of adoptee Cyril Avery. A simply wonderful read. -Nancy

  cabinattheendoftheworld

The Cabin at the End of the World by Paul Tremblay

What if the fate of humanity rested on an unthinkable choice? Tremblay poses this question in his gripping psychological thriller about the intersection of belief and paranoia and the sacrifices we will make for love. Seven-year-old Wen and her two loving fathers, Eric and Andrew, are vacationing at a remote lakeside cabin when they are confronted by three strangers who wield menacing objects and swear they need help to save the world. This is unnerving, suspenseful, real-world horror at its finest. -Krista

 

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